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http://hdl.handle.net/10609/92909
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dc.contributor.authorDíaz Reviriego, Isabel-
dc.contributor.authorFernández Llamazares, Álvaro-
dc.contributor.authorSalpeteur, Matthieu-
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Patricia L.-
dc.contributor.authorReyes García, Victoria-
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Autònoma de Barcelona-
dc.contributor.otherWageningen University and Research Centre-
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Oberta de Catalunya. Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3)-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T16:56:39Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-04T16:56:39Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-22-
dc.identifier.citationDíaz-Reviriego, I., Fernández-Llamazares, Á., Salpeteur, M., Howard, P.L. & Reyes-García, V. (2016). Gendered medicinal plant knowledge contributions to adaptive capacity and health sovereignty in amazonia. Ambio, 45(suppl.3), 263-275. doi: 10.1007/s13280-016-0826-1-
dc.identifier.issn0044-7447MIAR
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dc.identifier.issn1654-7209MIAR
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dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-84996522023-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10609/92909-
dc.description.abstractLocal medical systems are key elements of social-ecological systems as they provide culturally appropriate and locally accessible health care options, especially for populations with scarce access to biomedicine. The adaptive capacity of local medical systems generally rests on two pillars: species diversity and a robust local knowledge system, both threatened by local and global environmental change. We first present a conceptual framework to guide the assessment of knowledge diversity and redundancy in local medicinal knowledge systems through a gender lens. Then, we apply this conceptual framework to our research on the local medicinal plant knowledge of the Tsimane' Amerindians. Our results suggest that Tsimane' medicinal plant knowledge is gendered and that the frequency of reported ailments and the redundancy of knowledge used to treat them are positively associated. We discuss the implications of knowledge diversity and redundancy for local knowledge systems' adaptive capacity, resilience, and health sovereignty.en
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherAmbio-
dc.relation.ispartofAmbio, 2016, 45(suppl.3)-
dc.relation.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13280-016-0826-1-
dc.rightsCC BY-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/-
dc.subjectgendered knowledgeen
dc.subjectknowledge diversityen
dc.subjectknowledge redundancyen
dc.subjectlocal knowledge systemsen
dc.subjectlocal medical systemsen
dc.subjectTsimane'en
dc.subjectconocimiento de géneroes
dc.subjectdiversidad de conocimientoes
dc.subjectredundancia de conocimientoes
dc.subjectsistemas de conocimiento locales
dc.subjectsistemas médicos localeses
dc.subjectTsimane'es
dc.subjectconeixement de gènereca
dc.subjectdiversitat de coneixementsca
dc.subjectredundància del coneixementca
dc.subjectsistemes de coneixement localsca
dc.subjectsistemes mèdics localsca
dc.subjectTsimane'ca
dc.subject.lcshMedicinal plantsen
dc.titleGendered medicinal plant knowledge contributions to adaptive capacity and health sovereignty in Amazonia-
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article-
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion-
dc.subject.lemacPlantes medicinalsca
dc.subject.lcshesPlantas medicinaleses
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13280-016-0826-1-
dc.gir.idAR/0000005256-
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FP7/2007-2013-
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