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http://hdl.handle.net/10609/92920
Title: Visual contrast sensitivity improvement by right frontal high-beta activity is mediated by contrast gain mechanisms and influenced by fronto-parietal white matter microstructure
Author: Quentin, Romain
Elkin Frankston, Seth
Vernet, Marine
Toba, Monica N.
Bartolomeo, Paolo
Chanes Puiggros, Lorena
Valero Cabré, Antoni
Others: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)
Boston University School of Medicine
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Epinière
Keywords: brain
fronto-parietal connectivity
non-invasive neurostimulation
oscillation
superior longitudinal fasciculus
synchronization
visual perception
visuo-spatial attention
white matter anatomy
Issue Date: 21-Apr-2015
Publisher: Cerebral Cortex
Citation: Quentin, R., Elkin Frankston, S., Vernet, M., Toba, M.N., Bartolomeo, P., Chanes, L. & Valero-Cabré, A. (2016). Visual contrast sensitivity improvement by right frontal high-beta activity is mediated by contrast gain mechanisms and influenced by fronto-parietal white matter microstructure. Cerebral Cortex, 26(6), 2381-2390. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhv060
Also see: https://academic.oup.com/cercor/article/26/6/2381/1753738
Abstract: Behavioral and electrophysiological studies in humans and non-human primates have correlated frontal high-beta activity with the orienting of endogenous attention and shown the ability of the latter function to modulate visual performance. We here combined rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and diffusion imaging to study the relation between frontal oscillatory activity and visual performance, and we associated these phenomena to a specific set of white matter pathways that in humans subtend attentional processes. High-beta rhythmic activity on the right frontal eye field (FEF) was induced with TMS and its causal effects on a contrast sensitivity function were recorded to explore its ability to improve visual detection performance across different stimulus contrast levels. Our results show that frequency-specific activity patterns engaged in the right FEF have the ability to induce a leftward shift of the psychometric function. This increase in visual performance across different levels of stimulus contrast is likely mediated by a contrast gain mechanism. Interestingly, microstructural measures of white matter connectivity suggest a strong implication of right fronto-parietal connectivity linking the FEF and the intraparietal sulcus in propagating high-beta rhythmic signals across brain networks and subtending top-down frontal influences on visual performance.
Language: English
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10609/92920
ISSN: 1047-3211MIAR

1460-2199MIAR
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