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http://hdl.handle.net/10609/93049
Title: Does a 'protective' message reduce the impact of an advergame promoting unhealthy foods to children? An experimental study in Spain and The Netherlands
Author: Folkvord, Frans
Lupiáñez Villanueva, Francisco  
Codagnone, Cristiano
Bogliacino, Francesco
Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro
Gaskell, George
Others: Radboud University
Universidad Nacional de Colombia
University of Trento
London School of Economics and Political Science
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. Estudis de Ciències de la Informació i de la Comunicació
Keywords: childhood obesity
food advertisements
protective message
food intake
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2017
Publisher: Appetite
Citation: Folkvord, F., Lupiáñez-Villanueva, F., Codagnone, C., Bogliacino, F., Veltri, G., & Gaskell, G. (2017). Does a 'protective' message reduce the impact of an advergame promoting unhealthy foods to children? an experimental study in spain and the netherlands. Appetite, 112, 117-123. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2017.01.026
Also see: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/69206/1/Gaskell_Does%20a%20%E2%80%98protective%E2%80%99%20message%20reduce%20the%20impact%20of%20an%20advergame_author_2017.pdf
Abstract: The weight of evidence points to the advertising of food affecting food consumption, especially among children. Such advertising often promotes unhealthy foods. Current policy deliberations focus on developing effective "protective" messages to increase advertising literacy and consequent scepticism about advertising targeting children. This study examined whether incorporating a "protective" message in an advergame promoting energy-dense snacks would reduce children's snack intake. A randomized between-subject design was conducted in the Netherlands (N = 215) and Spain (N = 382) with an advergame promoting either energy-dense snacks or nonfood products. The results showed that playing an advergame promoting energy-dense snacks increased caloric intake in both countries, irrespective of whether the "protective" message was present or not. These results point to the limitations of "protective" messages and advertising literacy and provide policy makers with a rationale for extending the current prohibition of food advertising to young children in the terrestrial media to online environments.
Language: English
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10609/93049
ISSN: 0195-6663MIAR
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