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dc.contributor.authorDíaz Reviriego, Isabel-
dc.contributor.authorFernández Llamazares, Álvaro-
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Patricia L.-
dc.contributor.authorMolina, José Luis-
dc.contributor.authorReyes García, Victoria-
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Autònoma de Barcelona-
dc.contributor.otherWageningen University and Research Centre-
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Oberta de Catalunya. Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3)-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-11T07:54:05Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-11T07:54:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-09-
dc.identifier.citationDíaz-Reviriego, I., Fernández-Llamazares, Á., Howard, P.L., Molina, J.L. & Reyes-García, V. (2017). Fishing in the Amazonian forest: a gendered social network puzzle. Society & Natural Resources, 30(6), 690-706. doi: 10.1080/08941920.2016.1257079-
dc.identifier.issn0894-1920MIAR
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dc.identifier.issn1521-0723MIAR
-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10609/93067-
dc.description.abstractWe employ social network analysis (SNA) to describe the structure of subsistence fishing social networks and to explore the relation between fishers' emic perceptions of fishing expertise and their position in networks. Participant observation and quantitative methods were employed among the Tsimane' Amerindians of the Bolivian Amazon. A multiple-regression quadratic assignment procedure was used to explore the extent to which gender, kinship, and age homophilies influence the formation of fishing networks. Logistic regressions were performed to determine the association between fishers' expertise, their sociodemographic identities, and network centrality. We found that fishing networks are gendered and that there is a positive association between fishers' expertise and centrality in networks, an association that is more striking for women than for men. We propose that a social network perspective broadens understanding of the relations that shape the intracultural distribution of fishing expertise, as well as natural resource access and use.en
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherSociety & Natural Resources-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety & Natural Resources, 2017, 30(6)-
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/08941920.2016.1257079-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es-
dc.subjectfishing expertiseen
dc.subjectgender relationsen
dc.subjectperceptionsen
dc.subjectsocial network analysisen
dc.subjectsocial statusen
dc.subjectTsimane'en
dc.subjectT'simaneses
dc.subjectTsimane'ca
dc.subjectexperiència en pescaca
dc.subjectrelacions de gènereca
dc.subjectpercepcionsca
dc.subjectanàlisi de les xarxes socialsca
dc.subjectexperiencia en pescaes
dc.subjectrelaciones de géneroes
dc.subjectpercepcioneses
dc.subjectanálisis de las redes socialeses
dc.subjectestatus sociales
dc.subject.lcshFishing (Amazon River Region)en
dc.titleFishing in the Amazonian forest: a gendered social network puzzle-
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article-
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion-
dc.subject.lemacPesca (Amazònia)ca
dc.subject.lcshesPesca (Amazònia)es
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08941920.2016.1257079-
dc.gir.idAR/0000005242-
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