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Title: El reto de la accesibilidad para las webs del sector público antes la nueva directiva 2016/2102, ¿es la "AA" el destino final o solo el punto de partida? Testeo de la accesibilidad operativa de un trámite web y formulación de sugerencias de mejora
Author: Escarp Fernández, Rosa María
Director: Cerrillo Martínez, Agustí  
Tutor: Borge Bravo, Rosa  
Others: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Keywords: accessibility
directive 2016/2102
electronic administration
WCAG
Issue Date: 22-Jan-2018
Publisher: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Abstract: Accessibility compliance of Spanish websites is guaranteed nowadays by displaying the "AA" logo according to World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) rules. Forthcoming transposition in Spain of Directive 2016/2102, of October 26, on the accessibility of the websites and applications for mobile devices of public sector bodies, will impose regular verification to public sector websites, as well as responsibility for the producers of substantive contents that will be shown on the web. The relevance and necessity of this change motivates the analysis carried out by this TFM, questioning if the current declaration of compliance guarantees an effective accessibility to the procedures and services for people who use public sector websites through support products such as screen readers. Literature reviews verify accessibility relying on automated-tools engineering tests. Therefore, to provide a point of view that verifies the problem from the guarantee of people with disabilities' rights, real tests are carried out with four blind users, which are then contrasted with the results of those tools.
Language: Spanish
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10609/74545
Appears in Collections:Bachelor thesis, research projects, etc.

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