Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10609/148758
Title: Software Defined Network (Solución Cisco SDA)
Author: Díaz Senés, Juan Pedro  
López Sánchez-Montañés, Joaquín
Abstract: SDN technology finally arrives to what is currently known as Access Networks (LAN+WLAN) after demonstrating its significant benefits in both the Datacenter and WAN networks. Without a doubt, this is the biggest disruptive change these networks have faced in almost three decades. It involves a significant shift in paradigms both in their design and operation and maintenance. Its greatest contribution is the fact that it responds to the need to align with the business's "intentions" (intention based networking) and therefore represents a tool for creating value within any company. Cisco's DNA architecture, a central element of this memo, is particularly advanced in incorporating SDN in enterprise networks, so its deployment ensures maximum benefits for the organization such as greater simplification, agility, and effectiveness in implementing new services and reducing risks through integrated security. With this TFG I intend to facilitate understanding and introduce all readers to Software Defined Networking in its access layer (SDA), based on a practical case of migration from a raditional/legacy network to an SDN network.
Keywords: automatización
SDN
Overlay/Underlay
VXLAN
DNAC
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/bachelorThesis
Issue Date: 12-Jun-2023
Publication license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
Appears in Collections:Trabajos finales de carrera, trabajos de investigación, etc.

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